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May 03, 2010

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Paul Kaniska

Nice writeup. Interesting that the blog from the leading Gartner analyst on cloud integration contradicts your view on the acquisition -

http://blogs.gartner.com/benoit_lheureux/2010/05/03/ibm-acquires-cast-iron-its-about-cloud-services-integration-not-appliances/

Clint Wilson

Good point Paul and I wonder if Gartner will tell us the buyout price and make us all happy or sad in this biz. We are now at 100% off the stock market bottom and I would love to know the multiple they paid.

"within a few weeks Gartner will soon publish a detailed five-year forecast on this interesting market segment."

Bob Moul

I saw this as well Paul. The vast, vast majority of Cast Iron's business and clients are on its appliance offering - whether deployed on-prem or hosted "virtually" in an ASP model. Cast Iron only announced a cloud offering (meaning multi-tenant) last month as part of OmniConnect. So unless I'm missing something, what WebSphere bought was a predominantly single-tenant (non-SaaS) appliance-based business.

Alan Wilensky

IBM WebSphere is where "boxes" go to die. The DataPower acquisition is probably the most striking example of what a clever technology, designed by geniuses, cannot do.

In 2007 I published a voluminous report on the automotive ecommerce supply chain and networking sector; amongst commentary on the VANs and other issues, such as X12 vs. XML, was a chapter on the "XML Box". http://bit.ly/integrationreport

My take was that general server architectures and advanced server management would allow companies, like, yes, Boomi, to offer better tailored solutions than any box could ever offer.

I also posit that putting integration services or streaming file optimization operations into a "box" is merely a way for the technical management of services operation to "sell" the concepts of certain types of integration to less technical management.

Systems like Boomi, Mulesource, and Snaplogic, others, will always beat the box, that no matter how they claim is open, is just another means to tying up a set of interfaces into a physical space with limited capabilities.

Now, Bob, if we could only get Bommi to adopt ECGridOS, a truly 'out of the box' solution to integrated EDI Communications!

Have you seen our song? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UATIIy3XLAY

TaraSANDERS

People all over the world get the mortgage loans from different banks, because it is simple.

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